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Today’s links point to short articles that reflect some of the key questions in science, economics, and sociology. Interestingly, the one on Facebook shows some of our predictable qualities.

Rise of Robots – not a safe bet

With advanced robotics and artificial intelligence, the age-old argument of Robots vs humans persists. Some argue such robotic advancement is best for us because it can take over repetitive and uninteresting work or get precision into work. But, what’s the cost to humans? More importantly, if robots take over many of these jobs, in which areas would human effort be valued then?

http://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/j–bradford-delong-questions-paypal-co-founder-peter-thiel-s-argument-that-robots-will-save-us-from-a-low-wage-future

Facebook and relationships

Sometimes analysing data brings up fascinating things. How and how much you post on Facebook can help Facebook find out when you are in a relationship.

http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2014/02/when-you-fall-in-love-this-is-what-facebook-sees/283865/

Why poor Students struggle?

It is not only the economic element that is the reason for poor student’s struggle for a good education but also a complex interplay of socioeconomic factors.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/22/opinion/why-poor-students-struggle.html?ref=international

Sugar Daddies financing College Education

This writer seems to be in denial. When college girls are wooed by sugar daddies in the name of companionship, it is just another sophisticated form of prostitution.  Why do intelligent and smart girls (a few even from Ivy League colleges) do it?

http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2014/09/how-sugar-daddies-are-financing-college-education/379533/?single_page=true

 

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