Tags

, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

I (thankfully) happened to talk about my nagging upper left back pain with my colleague when the discussion was centred on bone-aches and therapy. He immediately said – “Oh that! That’s because of posture that we take while working on a laptop or on a computer.” He asked me stretch my back backwards or hold a better posture (straight not slouching) while sitting and miraculously, it has helped. Of course, I am no therapist to recommend any cures or preventive measures. But, it is common knowledge that slouching has its disadvantages and that our lifestyle dedicated to slouching more and more, and for longer hours exacerbates the problems. Being aware about the problem helps. However, when we are lost in our work, we naturally tend to slouch. Here’s a device that will give reminders when we slouch and coach us to improve our posture.

The bigger issue that the author tries to address is whether we will actually use the device.

http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2014/09/slouching-toward-not-slouching/380870/?single_page=true

Surprisingly, there is a correlation between extreme exercise and teeth cavities. Here’s how:

http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2014/09/how-exercise-could-erode-teeth/380851/

However, exercise has more benefits. What is more, you reap the benefits in less time:

http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2014/09/exercise-seems-to-be-beneficial-to-children/380844/

Advertisements