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Treasure hunters are travelling across the globe in search of precious stones and new sources of perishing resources. They come across a land which has colourful artwork and symbols that they have never seen earlier. The hunters belong to a race that like humans is curious. They are intrigued by the symbols and want to decipher the meaning. So they return with their exploring and digging tools. They toil day and night, and finally their effort bears the supposed fruit – their digging tool hits metal. The hunters are excited; they start digging furiously and unearth cans and cans of strong metallic canisters. They call in the experts to open these cans. After much effort, the cans are opened. But to the dismay of hunters, the cans just contain some strange material. Worse is to come as people in and those living kilometers around the site start reporting sick or start dying. Without realizing, the hunters have opened Pandora’s box of radioactive material buried more than twenty thousand years ago by us humans.

Scary, right? So, what must we do to warn future generations of toxic radioactive waste – especially waste that would retain its poisonous effects for 24,000 years! In that time frame, it is possible that languages, culture, generations, civilizations, or even humans would change.

http://daily.jstor.org/can-we-use-art-to-warn-future-humans-about-radioactive-waste/

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